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Conferences are a great way to get away from the computer screen, share ideas, thoughts on research and catch up with other academics from related fields so I felt very honoured to have a paper accepted as part of a panel presentation on the 2nd ‘Doing Women’s Film and Television History’ conference organised by a committee of academics from the Women’s Film and Television History Network (click on link to take you straight to their site).

The purpose of this conference is to provide a space for academics, activists and industry professionals to consider the specific contribution of women to film and television. Given that women have been significantly contributing to film and television for over a hundred years, it is perhaps a little depressing that this is only the second year that the conference has been running but here’s hoping that its scope and status continues to develop into the future.

I’ve attached the conference schedule so you can see the range of papers included and the names of all the contributors. My paper was part of a panel presentation alongside Dr Bridget Conor and PhD candidate Natalie Wreyford, both from Kings College London (click on links to go to their individual staff pages for bios etc) under the title Forget the female, take that away from my job title, I’m a writer and I expect to be treated the same’: Challenging myths of participation in creative work.

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Last Thursday (2nd Feb) I attended a lecture held at Amnesty International’s offices in London to hear Judith Butler and Sudeep Dasgupta discuss ‘paternalism’. The event was organised and curated by the Institute of International Visual Arts, Iniva, which programmes exhibitions, learning and research projects that seek to engage with new ideas and emerging debates in the contemporary visual arts, reflecting in particular the cultural diversity of contemporary society.

This event, part of Iniva’s ‘Keywords’ series of lectures takes its title from Raymond Williams’ seminal book ‘Keywords: a Vocabulary of Culture and Society’ (1976) which looks at how the meaning of words change as the context in which they are used changes about them. Each lecture invites different theorists, academics, artists to consider words such as ‘class’, ‘postcolonial’ and evaluate or respond to their meaning in contemporary society.

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